Models in Pronunciation Teaching

In the past, it was often assumed without further thought that learners should be taught to approximate to General British (GB) or General American (GA). Students assumed that they ought to sound like a native speaker. Teachers and published materials worked on the assumption that the model should be the native speaker accent with the widest acceptance and prestige. Indeed, this point of view is still widely held today. However, many people now question this assumption. Continue reading “Models in Pronunciation Teaching”

A Pronunciation Syllabus across ‘PronPack’

Resource Packs

Each book in PronPack 1-4 is different from the others by activity-type, rather than the pronunciation points covered. Each book is a resource pack taking one particular approach to a wide range of pronunciation points. All of the books move generally from individual sounds near the beginning to suprasegmental features towards the end. Continue reading “A Pronunciation Syllabus across ‘PronPack’”

The PronPack Sound Chart

PronPack Sound Chart Infograpic
This infographic explains how the PronPack Sound Chart is organised, click on the image to see a bigger picture.

What is the Sound Chart for?
The PronPack Sound Chart is primarily a reference tool and several versions will be are now available in the Resources to accompany the Pronpack books shortly.

Teachers may print a copy as large as possible to put on the classroom wall. Whenever a pronunciation point comes up in class relating to one or more of the individual sounds, you can point it out on the chart. Continue reading “The PronPack Sound Chart”